Ultimate Conversational Hypnosis

Conversational Hypnosis: Eye-Accessing Cues Part I

Conversational hypnosis is full of various techniques that you can use on other people to get what you want! It is a way that you can consciously act on their subconscious minds, without them knowing it. Of course, I always encourage people to use conversational hypnosis for good because there are so many powerful things you can do with conversational hypnosis.

In this article, I am going to introduce a unique and interesting topic. I am going to talk about eye-accessing cues. You can actually look at someone’s face and look at their eyes. You can watch the direction in which their eyes are moving with each thing that they are saying or thinking.

The importance of watching their eyes during a conversation is that their eyes can reveal what their mind is thinking. Now let’s talk about the six different eye-accessing cues:

Visually Created (VC): when someone is looking up and to the left (if you are facing them) they are visually creating something in their mind. They are trying to create a new image.

Auditory Created (AC): when someone is looking across to the left they are auditory creating something in their mind. They are trying create something that they heard.

Kinesthetic (K): when someone looks down to the left, they are creating something kinesthetically in their mind. They refer to the sense of touch or motion.

Visually Remembered (VR): when someone is looking up and to the right, they are remembering a visual image.

Auditory Remembered (AC): when someone is looking across and to the right, they are trying to remember something that they heard.

Internal Dialogue (ID): when someone is looking down and to the right, they are repeating their inner dialogue.

Watching someone’s eye-accessing cues takes practice. You have to be very in tune with what they are saying and the direction of their eye movements. As with any of these conversational hypnosis techniques, it will take some practice getting used to. I encourage you to practice with friends and really pay attention to their eye-accessing cues. Go have fun with it!


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